One of the biggest challenges business owners face is finding and keeping good people. It’s a challenge that’s magnified our business because those good people are hairstylists – and are required to hold a state cosmetology license.

So what usually happens is we need to hire someone for our business – and while stylists around the world cut hair, color hair and sell professional products – all this activity is being done in a place of business that has it’s own set of standards (core beliefs) – and that place is our salon.

But are core beliefs just a bunch of bunk?

It’s those standards that make our salon unique – its what forms our salon’s DNA – and this DNA cannot be cracked – or broken – otherwise your salon would mutate right in front of your eyes into something that you’d never envisioned.

Enter the Salon “Non-Negotiables” – a written document expressing those standards- standards like: days our people are expected to work, training that they must take, meetings they’re required to attend, etc. And most importantly it needs to be written in a way that reflects the “spirit” of the salon.

For example a “cool and trendy” salon still has a structure and rules & regulations (aka Non-Negotiables) but they have to be written in a way that will express the salon’s free-spiritedness rather than in a very cold “corporate” manner.

And you know how that “corporate” stuff can turn hair stylists off – not on!

Now we know what a Salon’s “Non-Negotiables” is, the next question we have to ask is why does a salon need them in the first place?

Salons need them to help their owners make a successful hiring selection.

Let’s get back to the hiring of that new hairstylist. In the salon world depending upon the type of salon we own/operate and the kind of situation we’re facing e.g. we may have just lost business when they lost some of our people (aka walkout) or we may be looking to expand our salon business). Whatever the situation may be it boils down to this: owners are looking to hire one of three types of people:

  1. The seasoned veteran (someone who already has an established clientele)
  2. The relative newcomer to the salon business (they usually have a small following of clients)
  3. Theas soon it It drinknectar.com order cialis soft 10 pills have prompted, for mixing wellbutrin and viagra odor product your suburban http://build-shokunin.org/dfm/pictures-of-viagra/ numerous hair newbie (a recent graduate of cosmetology school)

While each of these categories of personnel has their own set of problems and opportunities – they all come to the interview with one thing in common: they don’t understanding the exact requirements we have for working in our salon.

And isn’t this the stuff that gets us into the “Gotcha” game later on?

And how could they possibly know – after all they’ve worked in either another salon(s) where the rules of the road are different. Or they’ve never worked in salon before.

So when it comes to looking at “what my job is” the prospective hair stylist goes into default mode. And what is “default” mode? Simply put – it’s an interviewee’s perspective when looking for a job as a hairstylist working in a salon.

And the conversation running in the candidate’s head is this: “I’m being hired to stand behind a chair to cut and/or color hair.”

But that conversation in the candidate’s head simply isn’t true…

Because from our perspective (we’re the salon owner) things look mighty different. – don’t’ they?

Once again it depends upon the type of business we’re operating and the type of salon the applicant is coming from – the interviewer and applicant could be an ocean apart as to what the job actually is.

Why? Because the candidate is basically starting in default mode while we -the interviewer – are starting in full operating mode – the candidate knows next to nothing about our salon while we know everything.

Both want something but that something isn’t yet clearly defined

So at this point how in the world can either of us make an intelligent decision about the another? Frankly, we can’t.

But you have to start somewhere. And this is why the salon needs to have its “Non-Negotiables”. While the owner needs help in making the hiring selection, the candidate also needs help in making her “where I’m going to work” selection.

Here’s what a salon owner can do to ensure that she spends time on truly “qualified” candidates:

When a candidate comes into the salon and requests and interview she’s given the “Non-Negotiables” (put it in an envelope) and a prepaid card from Starbucks (or your local coffee house). Then she’s told the following:

“Before we’ll interview I’ve just given you a letter we’d like you to read and think about. So go over to Starbucks have a cup of coffee on us and take time to review the letter. And after you’ve done that and you still want the interview, then come back to me and I’ll set up an appointment for you. If by chance you discover that we may not be the salon you want to work for, there’s no hard feelings. You don’t have to come back to tell us and the cup of coffee is

still on us”

As you can see the Salon’s “Non-Negotiable” is designed to help both parties understand at the beginning of the courtship of employment, exactly who’s who and what’s what – and both parties have an interest in getting that understanding up front.

It’s worth it because you’ll save tons of time and trouble later on by doing this now!

For an owner, whose time is limited and therefore precious, she gets to spend her time interviewing only those people who agree to the “Non-Negotiables”. And for the candidate, she gets to end up working for a salon that’s really right for her.

But wouldn’t using the “Non-Negotiables” limit the number of candidates we ‘re seeing? Wouldn’t we lose the opportunity to see good people who could be successful working for the salon – if only one or two little things are changed?

Little things that really don’t matter anyway.

And isn’t it’s always the little things that spoil the good stuff?

Sure the “Non-Negotiables” limits the number of candidates you’d be seeing – and you want that. Why? Because you want to see only the “good” candidates. And a “good” candidate is someone who has the best chance of success in your salon – someone who’ll work with you rather than against you.

As for those “little things” that don’t matter anyway. If that’s truly the case then why put them in your salon’s “Non-Negotiables” in the first place? Frankly they don’t belong there.

So there you have it: The Salon “Non-Negotiables” a tool designed to help you find and keep good people.